Diary of a Sutton Councillor

Heartfelt stories from councillors for Anti-Bullying Week

The Liberal Democrat Group submitted a motion to Council relating to Anti-bullying Week 2018 promoted by the Anti-Bullying Alliance. It was proposed by Cllr Chris Williams and seconded by Cllr Jenny Batt, the two vice-chairs of the People Committee.

The motion recognised the increasing incidences of bullying, and resolved to be clear that bullying is unacceptable in any form. The motion contained a pledge by Sutton councillors to lead by example in our interactions, for the council to join the Anti-Bullying Alliance and undertake their training programme, and to ensure clear signposting for residents to appropriate support.

We were pleased that the motion achieved cross-party support.

Unfortunately time constraints meant that not all the speeches could be heard. Two of my colleagues had prepared speeches based on their personal experiences that they still wanted to share to show others that they are not alone:

Councillor Nali Patel

Dear Mr Mayor, please forgive me for not standing whilst I speak on the motion against bullying.
Everyone needs power and control in their lives.
However, people who bully others use their power in an unhealthy way to hurt someone else.
They cross other peoples’ emotional and physical boundaries, often with devastating effect.
Being disabled, I would like to talk about an incident to show how bullying has affected me emotionally.
I usually go to pay at the health counter in the Boots because it has easy access and also the counter is low enough for me to reach.
On one occasion, there were two queues. I joined one of them. We had to go in turn as only one counter was open. When my turn came I drove my scooter closer and placed my things on the counter.
All of a sudden I heard very abusive words from a lady with her baby. She touched my disability scooter and said I was pretending to be disabled. However much I tried to explain she turned deaf ears. The scene she created mesmerised and horrified me.
Eventually the manager came out and took the lady to another counter (without saying anything to me)
This left me feeling unwanted and useless. This type of bullying leaves a permanent mark.
Incidents, like this, are repeated on public transport and in many other places. I belong to British Polio Fellowship and such painful, bullying incidents are always discussed.
I fail to understand why, because we are disabled, it is thought OK to hurt us; to kick us when we are already down; to leave us on the verge of breaking down. We feel alone, with no one there to stand up for us, or to save us from the bullies.
Even in modern, enlightened Britain, the world is still for people who are physically fit. And the phrase, coined in the late nineteenth century, seems to me still to hold true today. It is “survival of the fittest.”

***

Councillor Muhammad Sadiq

Bullying – A problem which has been around globally for many, many years.
When speaking of bullying, we automatically think of the stereotypical scenario where a school kid is being pushed around in the playground by some ‘bullies.’
A recent poll found that almost half of children were worried about returning to school after the holidays because of bullying. These children are often the ones who suffer in silence because they are worried of the repercussions if they tell someone they are being bullied.
It is a common concept that people grow out of bullying and the term is often mistakenly linked to children and schools. A sad reality is that bullying is not confined to the playground.
A recent study has shown that work place bullying is increasing and many are still too afraid to speak about it.
A significant increase in racist bullying both verbal and physical has been reported since the Brexit referendum-yet another sad consequence of this vote.
This also links to another method of bullying on the rise: Cyber Bullying. A National Bullying Survey found that a staggering 42% of young people have felt unsafe online. Cyber bullying can occur 24 hours a day, 7 days a week putting no end to the victims’ misery, whether it is a young child or adult.
Bullying can affect a person’s well-being, academic or work place progress and the most common, a person’s mental health. I am sure we have all come across one too many articles of suicide due to bullying. These people either suffer in silence or not enough is done to hear their voice and concerns. No person, young or old, deserves to suffer any form of bullying.
Despite all the laws and procedures in place to deal with bullying, it is unfortunate that bullying has become normalised. We must all stand in unity, and do everything in our power to stamp down on bullying.

 

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November 27, 2018 - Posted by | Committee Meeting, Liberal Democrats | , , , , , , ,

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